Speech 2214
Good Citizenship Speech

Purpose: 
A)  To persuade your audience to become involved in an action that makes a positive difference in our community.
B)  To allow students an opportunity to discover the importance of and engage in individual action
.

Time Limit:

Part 1 (20 points): 1-2 minutes.  Any materials presented after 2 minutes, 30 seconds will not be considered part of the speech and will not be part of the graded materials.  Any speech less than 1 minute is generally not a passing speech and certainly no greater than a C.

Part 2 (180 points): 8-10 minutes.  Any materials presented after 9 minutes will not be considered part of the speech and will not be part of the graded materials.  Any speech less than 6 minutes is generally not a passing speech.

 

Delivery: Extemporaneous.   Only key words on note cards are recommended. I suggest no more than 3 note cards (or less). Do not write out your speech word-for-word on the cards or memorize. These notes are used to prompt, not as a manuscript (visit the website for sample cards).  When you use PowerPoint, you MUST NOT use note cards too.  This looks cumbersome.  Perhaps just lay a card down near the screen.

Procedure
1)  Choose a community action and/or issue that you support and then learn more!
You will write an advocacy speech for this assignment using Monroe’s Motivated Sequence. Topic suggestions are listed below and are certainly only a start.  I suggest you dial "211" and our student activities office for more ideas. Remember, this speech is ACTION based. You need to persuade us to do something. You must not persuade us to do something that you would not do yourself.  The “action” can be anything from, “vote this way,” “to join this group,” “attend this event,” or “read this literature.” The bottom line is to learn about a local concern or “need” and advocate for a well adapted solution or “satisfaction.”  Here are a few suggestions:

·        You could advocate for a local campus issue/action.

o       Eagles Telethon Fundraising, Student Lobby Days, The RCTC Common Book Issues and Activities with the Book Fast Food Nation, Attending Campus events/event (plays, concerts, specific speakers, meetings of groups on campus, etc.), Adopt a River, Tuition and Fees Issues, Use of the Sports Facility,  Diversity Issues on Campus, Policies within Academic Programs, etc.

·        You could look at the Greater Rochester community groups and issues.

o       Why not learn more about the issues concerning the organization that we will work with for our group project – the IMAA (Intercultural Mutual Assistance Association)?  The Coal Train Expansion, a town celebration committee (Rochester is celebrating its Sequential) and other nonprofit organizations (National Alliance for the Mentally Ill, United Way) are good ideas.

·        You might consider larger issues and see how local persons are connected.  IT IS AN ELECTION YEAR! (Hint: I am bound to ask you what our local officials think about this issue). Remember the key here is to tie these issues back to the local community.

o       Topic ideas here include the war on terrorism, peace and justice issues, faith concerns (e.g., politicians are being denied communion in the LaCrosse area if they oppose certain church beliefs), local and national elections, environmental concerns, etc.

·        You could pick a group that you belong to or are interested in volunteering for. 

o       You are welcome to speak about he group you choose to work with for your service learning project (or about issues that they take a stance upon, are faced by, etc.).  For example, the most popular service learning project for this class generally involves local schools. You could research more about their needs.  Topics here include the “no touching” policy, English as a Second Language programs being cut/proposed, sex education in schools,  racial tensions, etc.

o        You could even pick a different group to do a short term volunteer project with (e.g., the Eagles’ Telethon is coming up and more than likely you could do something to help them).

·         Other ideas certainly can be proposed to me…you merely need to show a local need and a local way to satisfy the need that we can take action in!  The action can be more informal (collecting Teddy Bears on our own for the Sheriff department) or formal (Channel One).

2)   Localize your topic by interviewing a "local expert."
You must prove that this topic area is a concern for our community. You need to show personalized connections to your audience. To do this, you will need to contact a "local" "expert" on your topic and interview him or her (if you reach a dead-end here, see me).  Include information you gain from this contact person in your speech. Additionally, make a clear statement of how this topic has an impact on OUR daily lives. Summarize what you learned from your interview in a paragraph (hand it in with your outline on the day of your speech and submit to D2L prior to your speech).

3) Research.

Use 4 sources in addition to your interview.  All sources must be credible and dated within the past 3-5 years (unless you can argue that your older source is relevant).  You must SAY all of your sources in your speech – who, where and when AND hand in (a paper version and D2L submission) of your typed bibliography.  You may not use a dictionary or encyclopedia for a source (unless it is a specialized academic one).  You must balance your sources carefully:  you should follow the rule of opponent, proponent, and neutral inclusions here.  Since these speeches are often about local issues, let me know if you have any trouble finding research.  You can use interviews but should balance interviews with print sources.  Try to avoid frivolous research such as "www.billybob'sopinion.com." 

4)  Survey your Audience.
You will survey the class on your topic prior to writing your speech. This will help you give an effective, well-adapted speech.  The survey will  be handed out prior to your speech as assigned in class. You will ask us to respond to at least 3 different questions about your speech topic (one fixed-response, one ranked question, and one open question – see attached sample survey).  When you have completed your survey, you will report your survey's results as outlined below and attach this report to your formal outline due on the day of your speech delivery (and submitted to D2L). Once you deliver your 1-2 minute "quick start persuasive appeal," you will be asked questions that you must also include in your final, formal speech.

When you deliver your Quick Start Persuasive Appeal, hand in:

·         What were the questions? List them.

·         Report the data for each question: What were the mean (average), the median, and the mode responses for your fixed response and ranked questions? In general what did you learn from the open question?

·         What did you infer about your audience from this data? Remember to explain this in at least a paragraph.

·         How did you use your data and inferences to adapt to your audience? Address this thoughtfully in at least a paragraph. Be specific in your response.  What was your target audience? Why did you pick the organizational pattern that you did?  Why did you select the evidence that you did, etc.

    • When you deiver your Formal Speech, hand in:
      How did you adapt to the response you received after your "quick start persuasive appeal?".

5) Part 1: for 20 points you will give us a quick start version of your speech...prior to the formal speeches, you will create a 1-2 minute persuasive appeal. It must meet the following criteria:

  • Be 1-2 minutes long
  • Be structured around an inductive or deductive argument
    • Inductive: for example, state several "cases" and make a conclusion (in case 1, the said something and something happened, in case 2 they said something and something happened, and in case 3 they said something and something happened)...therefore, we must say something!
    • Deductive: argue from a general to specific case...voting is critical to democracy, we live in a democracy, therefore you should vote.
  • Use 1 solid piece of evidence (cited w/ "who, where and when")
  • Be adapted to this audience, based upon the survey above. 
  • Use great delivery!
  • Have an opening, body, and closing.
6) Write and Outline your Speech using the Motivated Sequence
Now you are ready to write your speech using the motivated sequence organizational pattern. You must use this organizational pattern.

·         Organize your speech in a 8-10 minute persuasive message.  Any materials presented after 11 minutes will not be considered part of the speech and will not be graded.

·         In your appeal you will attempt to persuade us to also become involved in your organization or issue.  You will need to be very specific with what you want us to do (dates, locations, times, etc.).

·         You must not persuade us to do something that you have not done and/or will not do.

·         We will use the motivated sequence in this speech:  (attention, need, satisfaction, visualization, action -- see the text and the attached worksheet). See the links on our website and the text for more information on this pattern. Ask me if you have any questions about this format. There is a sample outline online (some requirements might have varied from course to course though). 

·         OUTLINE:  Hand in a typed, full-sentenced, fully documented outline and bibliography on the day of your speech.  Also submit your written materials through D2L by the day of your speech. 

o        This might be different from your 1114 speech class, so see the outline worksheet for the preferred format.

o        If you need a refresher on how to create a bibliography, see www.stylewizard.com. 

o        Remember to highlight the rhetorical techniques as mentioned below.

 

A) Rhetorical Techniques.
Show your advanced (2214 level not 1114 level) of critical thinking in this speech!  Use critical thinking skills!  To do so you will apply these advance rhetorical techniques in the speech.  Please highlight with a colored highlighter and label each area on your full-sentence outline. 
  • Reasoning:  You must have one inductive or one deductive argument embedded in your speech. Highlight and label the argument in your outline.
  • Language Use: Use language effectively! Through this requirement, you will pick one area of your speech to especially focus upon. Appeal to the 5 senses…tell us how it tastes, feels, looks, smells, and/or sounds. Also, use alliteration deliberately some place in the speech and a metaphor and/or simile. Label and highlight these areas in yellow or some other color so I can see that you did this

    B) PowerPoint and Visual Aids
The Effective Use of PowerPoint and One Additional Visual Aid are required.  Every semester, unfortunately, someone loses their PowerPoint presentation. Thus, you MUST email a copy of it to me via D2L prior to class AND bring two Floppy (or CD) versions of it to class.  Unfortunately, you will have to go ahead with your speech even if your PowerPoint does not work unless the failure is a RCTC system error.  Please load your presentation on the hard-drive prior to class to expedite the process.

7) Self Assessment:  We will video tape your speeches, please bring a videotape on the day of your speech.  Don’t worry only you and I will ever see these.  After your speech, you will fill out the D2L self-assessment worksheet. 

8)  Speech Buddies:  You will be assigned “Speech Buddies” and provide them with feedback.

9) Resulting Action: You must DO something with your materials...you could write a letter to the Editor, go to a meeting, make a presentation elsewhere, hold a ralley, who knows!?

To summarize, this is what you need to hand in:

  • "Quick Start Persuasive Appeal" hand in your audience analysis and give your presentation (remember to bring your video-tape).
  • Due on the day of your speech (on a hard paper copy to Lori and submit to D2L prior to class):
    • A typed full-sentence outline, complete with source citations. 
    • Label and highlight within your outline your rhetorical techniques (argument, alliteration, metaphor/simile and appeals to the senses) as listed above.
    • Bibliography.
    • Audience Survey Report.
    • A brief summary of who you interviewed and what you learned.
    • Your PowerPoint presentation must be emailed to me in D2L prior to class and you need two disc/cd copies for yourself. Please load your presentation on the hard-drive prior to class to expedite the process.
    • Additional Visual Aid.
    • A blank videotape.

  • Due one class period after your speech – Submit to D2L your Self Assessment.
  • Due at the end of the speech round -- speech buddy feedback forms.

 


Great Ideas to get Started!

Ideas for contacts:

RCTC:

o         http://www.rctc.edu/html/enrolled.html

o         Student Affairs Information: (507) 285-7205.

Rochester's Local Governmental Sites:

·          http://www.ci.rochester.mn.us/

·        City Development Information: http://www.ci.rochester.mn.us/planning/devguide/devguide.htm

·        Rochester's Elected Officials: http://www.ci.rochester.mn.us/council/

·          Mayor Chuck Canfield :http://www.ci.rochester.mn.us/mayor/

·          Park and Rec Department: http://www.ci.rochester.mn.us/park/

·          Adopt a Pet: http://www.ci.rochester.mn.us/police/animaladopt.htm

·          United Way of Olmsted County: http://www.uwolmsted.org/

·          County On-Line: http://www.olmstedcounty.com/

·          Stewartville: http://www.stewartville.com/

Other Sources:

·          KTTC: http://www.kttc.com/

·          Post-Bulletin: http://www.postbulletin.com/

·          Family Services: http://www.familyservicerochester.org/

·          NAMI (National Alliance for the Mentally Ill): http://www.rochestermn.com/nami/index.html

·          Paws and Claws: http://www.pawsandclaws.org/

·          Areas Social Services: http://www.rochestermn.com/community/ss/index.stm

State Information: http://www.state.mn.us/

·          http://www.dfl.org/

·          http://www.gop-mn.org/

·          List of members of the MN State House of Representatives: http://www.house.leg.state.mn.us/hinfo/mem.htm

·          A clickable map of MN Representatives: http://lije.commissions.leg.state.mn.us/scripts/esrimap.dll?name=Tutorial5&Cmd=Map

·          Find your Legislative District: http://lije.commissions.leg.state.mn.us/scripts/esrimap.dll?name=tutorial5&Cmd=MCD-List

·          Pioneer Planet's Search Engine: http://www2.pioneerplanet.com/precinct/

Federal Representation:

·          http://www.state.mn.us/govtoffice/mncongress.html

·        Current Congress Representative Gil Gutknecht: http://www.house.gov/gutknecht/

·        U.S. Senators: Senator Mark Dayton  or Senator Norm Coleman

 

 

Sample Survey

OBJECTIVE: The reason you survey the audience is to help you find out more about how the class feels and knows  about your topic. This will help you to adapt to us -- you need not guess so much about "what might they want to know about this topic."   You are only required to ask three basic types of questions as listed below. You may ask more questions if you find that helpful.  Remember, you will report on your response as indicated below.

1) One question must be a fixed-response question, for example:

Have you ever received a speeding ticket? yes or no

or...

How often do you speed:

___ 1 time a week or less

___ 2-3 times a week

___ 3-5 times a week

___ 5-7 times a week

___ more than 1 time a day

 

2) One question must be a ranked question to measure the depth of feeling, understanding, etc. For example:

"On a scale of 1 - 10, how often do you wear your seatbelt?"

I never wear it 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 every time I get into the car

3) One question must be an open question to allow for a free-flowing response. For example:

"What, if anything, should be done to ensure more safe driving?"

 

So you could write your survey out like this:

 

Lori's Survey for Speech 1

1.Have you ever received a speeding ticket?

yes _____

no _____

2. On a scale of 1 - 10, how often do you wear your seatbelt?

I never wear it 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 every time I get into the car

3.  What, if anything, should be done to ensure more safe driving?

 

 

 

Then you will report your survey's results like this:

Audience Survey and Adaptation Report

You will write a brief report on your data and how your adapted to your audience.  This will be attached to your outline and will be handed in the day of your speech

A. What were the questions? -- Yes, write each one out.

B.  Report the data for each question: What were the mean (average), the median, and the mode responses for your fixed response and ranked questions? In general what did you learn from the open question?

C. What did you infer about your audience from this data? Remember to explain this in at least a paragraph.

D.  How did you use your data and inferences to adapt to your audience? Address this thoughtfully in at least a paragraph. Be specific in your response.  What was your target audience? Why did you pick the organizational pattern that you did?  Why did you select the evidence that you did, etc.

 

 

Buddy Feedback Forms:

Your Name:       __________________________________________________________

Buddy #1’s Name and Topic: ________________________________________________

·         What did your buddy do best concerning delivery? 


·         What should your buddy improve upon concerning delivery?


·         Comment upon how well your buddy accomplished each of the steps of the Motivated Sequence:

            Attention:

            Local Need with Proof with Proof:

            Local Satisfaction of Need with Proof:

            Local Action with Specifics of Where, When, etc:.

            A Call to Action:

·         Finally, comment upon the speaker’s use of sources and visual aids.

 

******************************************************************************

Your Name:       __________________________________________________________

Buddy #2’s Name and Topic: _______________________________________________

·         What did your buddy do best concerning delivery? 


·         What should your buddy improve upon concerning delivery?


·         Comment upon how well your buddy accomplished each of the steps of the Motivated Sequence:

            Attention:

            Local Need with Proof with Proof:

            Local Satisfaction of Need with Proof:

            Local Action with Specifics of Where, When, etc:.

            A Call to Action:

·        Finally, comment upon the speaker’s use of sources and visual aids.

 

Your Name:       __________________________________________________________

Buddy #3’s Name and Topic: _______________________________________________

·         What did your buddy do best concerning delivery? 


·         What should your buddy improve upon concerning delivery?


·         Comment upon how well your buddy accomplished each of the steps of the Motivated Sequence:

            Attention:

            Local Need with Proof with Proof:

            Local Satisfaction of Need with Proof:

            Local Action with Specifics of Where, When, etc:.

            A Call to Action:

·         Finally, comment upon the speaker’s use of sources and visual aids.

 

******************************************************************************

Your Name:       __________________________________________________________

Buddy #4’s Name and Topic: _______________________________________________

·         What did your buddy do best concerning delivery? 


·         What should your buddy improve upon concerning delivery?


·         Comment upon how well your buddy accomplished each of the steps of the Motivated Sequence:

            Attention:

            Local Need with Proof with Proof:

            Local Satisfaction of Need with Proof:

            Local Action with Specifics of Where, When, etc:.

            A Call to Action:

·         Finally, comment upon the speaker’s use of sources and visual aids.

_________________________________________

MONROE'S MOTIVATED SEQUENCE
ORGANIZATIONAL PATTERN 

This design works best for action speeches; it is very effective for many purposes though!!!  It follows a pattern similar to the problem solution pattern, but ends with more emphasis upon how action can be taken to actually help the solution come true!  Television commercials, informationals, telemarketers and the basic sales pitch often follow this pattern. The five steps include: attention, need, satisfaction, visualization and action.  See your text for more information.  This outline worksheet will help you to write a strong speech.  However, it is just a one format, you certainly can adapt it to your own approach. Certainly you might use two quotes and three statistics vs. the suggested sub-subpoint items below. You must follow the basic outline features though (intro’s and conclusion’s elements, basic order, transitions, etc.). 

OUTLINE WORKSHEET MOTIVATED SEQUENCE DESIGN
(adapted from: Osborn & Osborn, 1997)

SPEECH TITLE

Name:
Topic:

Specific Purpose:

Target Audience:

 

I. Introduction

A. Attention Material (focus attention on problem):

B. Tie to Audience:

C. Credibility Material:

D. Thesis & Preview:

(Transition into Body of Speech)

II. Body

A. Main Point #1 -- Need

1.  (Statement of Need for Action)

a.  (Description of Problem)

b.  (Signs, Symptoms, Effects of Problem)

c.  (Example, Narrative, or Testimony)

2. (Importance of Problem)

a.  (Extent of Problem)

b.  (Facts/Statistics)

c.  (Expert Testimony)

3. (Who is Affected)

a. (Facts/Statistics)

b. (Example/Narrative)

(Transition into Main Point 2)

 

B.  Main Point #2 (Present Solution that Satisfies Need)

1. (Description of Solution)

2.  (Justification of Solution)

a. (How Solution Satisfies Need)

b. (How Solution can be Implemented)

(1) (Plan of Action)

(2) (Steps of Plan)

(i) (Step 1 of Plan)

(ii) (Step 2 of Plan)

(Transition into Main Point 3)

 

C. Main Point #3 (Visualize Results)

1. (Describe Expected Results of Action)

2. (Describe Consequences of Inaction)

 

III. Conclusion

A. Brake light (Indicate an end is coming):

B. Summary:

C. Tie Back to Audience:

D. Concluding Remarks: (Remember to include a Call for Action!)